Why this hatred towards Elon Musk? – Companies

 Why this hatred towards Elon Musk?  - Companies

We can still give Elon Musk the benefit of the doubt, without systematically criticizing everything he does.

After many adventures, Elon Musk finally bought Twitter. And that earned him a lot of criticism, at least in Europe. We have the right to like or not the one who created Tesla. It has done so successfully and manufactures electric cars, a product that is often, though perhaps mistakenly, seen as environmental progress. He was also the one who made many dream by creating SpaceX. The whole thing, and this is perhaps what bothers some, becoming one of the richest men in the world.

After many adventures, Elon Musk finally bought Twitter. And that earned him a lot of criticism, at least in Europe. We have the right to like or not the one who created Tesla. It has done so successfully and manufactures electric cars, a product that is often, though perhaps mistakenly, seen as environmental progress. He was also the one who made many dream by creating SpaceX. The whole thing, and this is perhaps what bothers some, becoming one of the richest men in the world. No sooner had he bought Twitter than the European press, almost unanimous, reproached him for anything and everything. We started by pretending to be surprised that he immediately fired all the leaders. You really have to know nothing about business takeovers and totally lack logic to issue such a criticism. If someone spends 44 billion dollars to buy a firm, it is obviously to control it and certainly not by leaving in power former leaders with whom we have been on trial and who are accused of bad management. In the event of a hostile takeover, that is to say against the will of the existing administrators, the first thing that is always done is to get rid of them. And to do the same with the lawyers of the group with whom we have just scrapped for months… Of course, then dismissing half the staff may seem unfriendly. But there again, it is in the economic logic of a different project and management. And why does Thierry Breton, European Commissioner, begin by recalling that Twitter will have to “respect our rules”, before this firm has taken the slightest new initiative? Do we do this for all companies that change direction? Does this French politician really imagine that such a large firm intends to knowingly break laws, to risk fines of tens of millions of euros? We hesitate, on the part of the European Commissioner, between naivety and, more likely, the desire to get people talking about him. Others are already criticizing the choice to create paid subscriptions. It is certainly a change of model, but it is necessary to choose: a firm of this kind depends either on its customers, who pay contributions, or on its advertisers. Most of the press has made the same choice as Elon Musk by paying for access to most of the information on its sites. And in general, we applauded the independence of the press thus more or less regained. Why does it become questionable when Elon Musk decides it? We know it well, there is no free product. If you are not asked for anything, and you are provided with services like Google does, for example, it is because “the product is you”. You do not pay a membership fee but you provide multiple and very valuable data, the collection of which provides the multinational with a gold mine. Isn’t it clearer if you’re paying for a service? Isn’t it better for customers to decide, possibly leaving Twitter, than to make this company dependent on a few large multinationals who, as advertisers, pressure the admission of certain content? Nothing says that Elon Musk’s takeover of Twitter will necessarily be progress for freedom. But we can still give him the benefit of the doubt when no measure has yet been implemented, without systematically criticizing everything he does. We can’t help but think that, for some people, it’s all pure and simple jealousy towards someone who, so far, has done everything right.

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